Course Information

 

for General Education Department


A&P I Remediation Module 1 (BIO 050-M1)

Credits:0

Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 111)

Credits:3

Anatomy & Physiology I is the first semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Anatomy is the study of the form of the body and physiology is the study of body function. This course begins with instruction in the terminology needed to be able to intelligently and accurately read and communicate biological concepts in an appropriate system level of the human organism. Students will also study the classification of tissues, genetics and inheritance, as well as the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, blood, lymphatic/immune, and reproductive. In general, the lecture portion of the class will emphasize the physiological concepts and the laboratory section will emphasize anatomy. Anatomy can be better studied and easier learned by visualization in a three dimensional manner by using anatomical aids, such as models, charts, specimens, and slides which are available in the laboratory. Pre-requisite: high school level chemistry is required

Human Anatomy & Physiology I - Lab (BIO 111-L)

Credits:1

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 112)

Credits:3

This lecture and laboratory course is the second semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. This course continues the study of the structure and function of the human body and the body's reaction to physiological stress. This course, when taken following BIO 111 Anatomy and Physiology I, will provide the students with a basic understanding and working knowledge of the human body. Students will study fluid/electrolyte/acid-base balance as well as the following systems: nervous, sensory-motor, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine. As in Anatomy and Physiology I, in general, the lecture portion of the class will emphasize the physiological concepts and the laboratory section will emphasize anatomy. Pre-requisite: BIO 111 with lab

Human Anatomy & Physiology II - Lab (BIO 112-L)

Credits:1

Microbiology (BIO 213)

Credits:3

Microbiology is a lecture and laboratory course. The lecture provides a survey of the microbial world, including bacteria, yeasts, molds, fungi, viruses and prions, and introduces the structure, function, and nutrition of microorganisms. The primary focus of the course is on the relationship between humans and microbes ranging from the various forms of parasitism to disease to immunity. Students will develop a solid understanding of prokaryotic cell structure and be introduced to bacterial genetics and metabolism, control of microbial growth, how microbes cause specific disease, and various public health and medical interventions to combat microbial disease. The laboratory component is designed to compliment the lecture by engaging the student in the performance of the laboratory techniques and procedures that are routine to modern microbiology. Topics covered include aseptic technique, maintenance, isolation, and differential cultures of microorganisms, microbial metabolic assays, and microbial staining. Pre-requisites: BIO 111 and Bio 112

Microbiology Laboratory (BIO 213-L)

Credits:1

Communications (COM 102)

Credits:3

This is a hybrid course with an online component. Prerequisites: Completion of College Writing with an a grade of C or higher or Accuplacer WritePlacer Score of 5 or higher and Reading Comprehension Score of 60 or higher. The importance of good communication skills can never be over-emphasized. In all professions including healthcare, we are asked to send clear messages, be able to receive and interpret messages correctly, and respond appropriately. Although most of us will never become professional public speakers, we are always expected to be able to understand the basic elements of good communication. To that end the course will cover verbal and non-verbal communication skills, listening, writing, messages, notes, memos, and public speaking.

Developmental Writing (ENG 010)

Credits:3

Developmental Writing is a 3 credit course designed to help students achieve basic competencies in reading comprehension and writing, including sentence skills, grammar, and mechanics, planning documents, organizing papers, developing research skills, following written instructions, and comprehending written documents. This course will also address word recognition, vocabulary development, and identifying themes and main ideas in written documents. In addtion the course will address basic software skills necessary to complete online learning goals, access online research platforms, and write documents using word processing software.

College Writing (ENG 101)

Credits:3

Hybrid Course with Online Component. College Writing develops the student's ability to write clearly and effectively. This course introduces the student to academic writing, APA citation style, research-based exposition, and the fundamentals of academic research. This course introduces students to the development and synthesis of argumentation in the writing process. Revision and editing will be introduced to help students develop skills to consistently improve their writing skills. Practice in expository writing - specifically informative, persuasive, analytical, and narrative- will be the focus.

Introduction to Literature (ENG 110)

Credits:3

This course will focus on developing the skill to interpret. While focusing on improving interpretation of literature, this course emphasizes on the students ability to analyze, critique, and engage with all aspects of life, from politics to socialization, from history to art, from math to physics. By engaging with fantastical fiction, the student may explore the roles that fantasy takes on society and individual life, examine the philosophy behind fantasy while developing the ability to question purpose, improve critical thinking skills by searching for deeper truths in literature, develop a deeper appreciation for language and linguistics and explore the subtleties of words. The student will develop reading and researching skills as he/she engages in various analytical projects within this course. This course improves communication skills as the student develops the ability to articulate personal philosophies and observations of art, and increases the overall knowledge of humanities overall.

Professional Writing (ENG 140)

Credits:3

Introduction to Healthcare Science (HCS 101)

Credits:3

Prerequisite: Completion of College Writing with a grade of C or higher may substitute for Accuplacer WritePlacer Score of 5 or higher and Reading Comprehension Score of 60 or higher. This course is designed as an introductory exploration of the health care sciences for beginning students who might be interested in pursuing a future in various health-related professions. This course will serve as a solid foundation for students in health sciences or health occupations. Introducing students to a variety of health occupations, this course assists students in acquiring the basic knowledge and professional behaviors required to work and interact with patients in a healthcare setting.

The Health Care Envrironment: A Look at the Health Care System - Past, Today, Future (HIS 210)

Credits:3

This course will provide an introduction to the US health care system, the history, its problems and possible solutions. Discussion will include the definition of health, identification of the health care workforce and their function as part of the US health care system. The role of hospitals, primary care, ambulatory care, federal and state government in the US health care system will be described. An investigation of US health care finance and the need for health care reform will be included.

Ethics in Healthcare (HUM 205)

Credits:3

Prerequisites: Completion of College Writing with a grade of C or higher or Accuplacer WritePlacer Score of 5 or higher and Reading Comprehension Score of 60 or higher. This course introduces health career students to ethical and bio-ethical issues confronting the health care professionals within the practice setting. This course will introduce the student to the language of ethics and to ta decision-making process. Using cases, students will learn to apply ethical decision-making principles to practical dilemmas. The course will familiarize students with ethical and legal considerations, patient-provider relationships, and the concepts of moral judgment and prudence.

Ethics and Clincial Care (HUM 206)

Credits:3

Everyday clinical providers are dealing with dilemmas. Family issues, care planning, goal setting, and non-compliance force their way into providing care.What are the red flags? How does the caregiver develop options for the decision makers? What is good information sharing? How does the caregiver get assistance in the ethical decision-making process? This course will take you through an introduction to ethical decision-making, its rules and guidelines, developing a process of review and information sharing. Using a case study approach, the class participant will hone their ethics intuitiveness and develop a broader plan of options that the patient with their decision counselors can choose from.

Topics in Multiculturalism (HUM 220)

Credits:3

Arts and Humanities Elective (HUM*)

Credits:3

Math Review (MAT 011)

Credits:3

This course will focus on the fundamentals of numerical mathematics, including basic arithmetic operations with integers, fractions, decimals, and percents; a reivew of unit ocnversion, basic algebraic techniques, and an introduction to computing probabilities of events.

College Algebra (MAT 140)

Credits:3

This Course will review standard college-level algebra topics including linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, the study of inequalities, graphical analysis, polynomials, systems of equations, and more. Throughout this course focus will be placed on the application of these topics to real live problems.

Medical Terminology (MET 111)

Credits:3

This is a hybrid course with an online component. Prerequisites: Completion of College Writing with a grade of C or higher may substitute the Accuplacer WritePlacer Score of 5 or higher and Reading Comprehension Score of 60 or higher. This course is designed to assist the student to develop a medical terminology vocabulary, utilizing a body systems approach, that will facilitate communication of medical information in a medical office or hospital environment. The student will learn and practice the principles of medical word formation, including the basic rules of building medical words, identifying suffixes, prefixes, and combining forms related to the structure and function of the associated systems of the body.

Phlebotomy (PHL 100)

Credits:2

High School Graduation or GED required to attend this course

Introduction To Psychology (PSY 101)

Credits:3

Developmental Psychology (PSY 201)

Credits:3

Developmental Psych. 8 weeks (PSY 201I)

Credits:3

Reiki: History and Practice (REI 290)

Credits:3

College Writing with a minimum grade of "C" required or Accuplacer WritePlacer minimum score of "5" and Accuplacer Reading Comprehension minimum score of "60"

Bridge to College Transition (SEM 020)

Credits:1

This 1 credit course is offered over two consecutive days to maximize the learning experience. This course is mandatory for students enrolling in the nursing, radiology, or nuclear medicine programs who have not previously completed at least 12 college credits of academic course work. It is recommended for anyone who is interested in learning skills needed to be a successful student at CMMC College of Nursing and Health Professions. In this course the student will learn study skills and test-taking strategies, develop time management strategies for dealing with the intensive course load at this college, learn how to navigate the college system, and learn APA citation style and information literacy.

Introduction to Sociology (SOC 101)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the study of human society. The course stresses the learned nature of human behavior as is seen in the ongoing interactions between individuals, groups, and society. Because sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior, and the interaction between humans and the social institutions they've created, the course examines aspects of social life, social factors, and social problems present in contemporary society. More specifically the course repesents basic concepts and theories and explores topics including sociology as science, culture, socialization, social groups, social organization, class, race and ethnicity, gender, age, family, and social change.

Social Science Elective (SSC)

Credits:3