Course Information

 

for General Education Department


A&P I Remediation Module 1 (BIO 050-M1)

Credits:0

General A&P Lab (BIO 105L)

Credits:0

Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 111)

Credits:3

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology, and it is accompanied by a one-credit lab course. This course emphasizes human physiology, and the accompanying laboratory course emphasizes human anatomy. Students explore the structures and functions of the human organism at the chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, and systems levels, and learn terminology that is necessary to comprehend and appropriately communicate biological concepts. Common diseases in certain systems are explored.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I - Lab (BIO 111-L)

Credits:1

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology. This laboratory course is designed to complement the lecture course BIO 111, and will emphasize anatomy. Students explore the structures of the human organism at the chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, and systems levels, and learn terminology that is necessary to comprehend and appropriately communicate biological concepts.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 112)

Credits:3

BIO 112 is the continuation of BIO 111, covering human anatomy and physiology and it is accompanied by a one-credit lab course. This course emphasizes human physiology, and the accompanying laboratory course emphasizes human anatomy. Anatomy & Physiology II continues the study of the structure and function of organ systems, as well as fluid & electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, and early development. Common diseases in certain systems are explored. Students continue to learn terminology that is necessary to comprehend and appropriately communicate biological concepts.

Human Anatomy & Physiology II - Lab (BIO 112-L)

Credits:1

BIO 112L is the continuation of BIO 111L, covering human anatomy. This laboratory course is designed to complement the lecture course (BIO 112), and will emphasize the anatomy and functions of particular structures and organs in the following systems: endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, the urinary system, reproductive systems. Students also study heredity, and structures involved in growth and development.

Microbiology (BIO 213)

Credits:3

This lecture course designed to run concurrently with its complementary laboratory course. The lecture provides a survey of the microbial world including bacteria, yeast, molds, fungi, and viruses. The primary focus of the course is on the relationship between humans and microbes ranging from the various forms of parasitism to disease to immunity. Students develop an understanding of prokaryotic cell structure, bacterial genetics and metabolism, control of microbial growth, how microbes cause specific disease, and various public health and medical interventions to combat microbial disease.

Microbiology Laboratory (BIO 213-L)

Credits:1

This course is designed to complement the Lecture portion of BIO 213 Medical Microbiology by engaging the student in the performance of the laboratory techniques and procedures that are routine to modern microbiology. Topics covered include aseptic technique, maintenance, isolation, and differential cultures of microorganisms, microbial metabolic assays, and microbial staining.

Communications (COM 102)

Credits:3

This is a hybrid course with an online component. Prerequisites: Completion of College Writing with an a grade of C or higher or Accuplacer WritePlacer Score of 5 or higher and Reading Comprehension Score of 60 or higher. The importance of good communication skills can never be over-emphasized. In all professions including healthcare, we are asked to send clear messages, be able to receive and interpret messages correctly, and respond appropriately. Although most of us will never become professional public speakers, we are always expected to be able to understand the basic elements of good communication. To that end the course will cover verbal and non-verbal communication skills, listening, writing, messages, notes, memos, and public speaking.

College Writing (ENG 101)

Credits:3

College Writing is a required course, which develops the student’s ability to write clearly and effectively. The course introduces the student to academic writing, APA citation style, research-based exposition, and the fundamentals of academic research. The course introduces students to the development and synthesizing of argumentation in the writing process. Revision and editing will be introduced to help students develop skills to consistently improve their writing skills. Practice in expository writing – specifically informative, persuasive, analytical, and journalistic – will be the focus.

Introduction to Literature (ENG 110)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. By studying important works by writers of culturally diverse backgrounds, students gain experience in reading, analyzing, interpreting, and writing about literature. This course establishes connections between literature and other areas of arts and communications.

Professional Writing (ENG 140)

Credits:3

English Literature (ENG 210)

Credits:3

English Literature explores various genres of literature. Students will read select passages and literary works as they explore various styles, themes, and modalities of writing.

Introduction to Healthcare Science (HCS 101)

Credits:3

This course is designed as an introductory exploration of the health care sciences for entry-level students who are interested in pursuing a career in various health-related professions. This course will serve as a solid foundation for students entering a variety of health occupation programs. Core competencies shared by all health professionals such as communication, infection control, and professionalism are provided as an exposure to the reality of practice. This course assists students in acquiring the basic knowledge and professional behaviors required to work and interact with patients in a healthcare setting.

The Health Care Environment: A Look at the Health Care System - Past, Today, Future (HIS 210)

Credits:3

This course will provide an introduction to the US health care system, the history, its problems and possible solutions. Discussion will include the definition of health, identification of the health care workforce and their function as part of the US health care system. The role of hospitals, primary care, ambulatory care, federal and state government in the US health care system will be described. An investigation of US health care finance and the need for health care reform will be included.

Topics in Multiculturalism (HUM 220)

Credits:3

This course will examine the issues of multiculturalism, societal diversity, and the histories of the people that comprise our communities. Discussion of diverse populations will cover groups of color and race, nationality, faith, indigenousness and immigration, LGBQTI, and ability. Students will locate their own perspectives and analyze how one’s own experiences shape the way they tell the story of what they see happening in the world. Additionally, students will analyze how the experiences of people different from themselves will affect the perspectives of others in a multicultural society.

Arts and Humanities Elective (HUM*)

Credits:3

Math Review (MAT 011)

Credits:3

This course will focus on the fundamentals of numerical mathematics, including basic arithmetic operations with integers, fractions, decimals, and percents; a reivew of unit ocnversion, basic algebraic techniques, and an introduction to computing probabilities of events.

College Algebra (MAT 140)

Credits:3

This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of fundamental algebraic skills and techniques as well as to train you in applying those skills in professional, personal and academic situations. We will review standard college-level algebra topics including linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; the study of inequalities; graphical analysis; polynomials; systems of equations; and more. Throughout the course, focus will include the application of these topics to real problems.

Introduction to Statistics (MAT 160)

Credits:3

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to foundational elements in the study of statistics. Topics will include the study of sampling and data collection, descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.

Medical Terminology (MET 111)

Credits:3

This course is designed to assist the student to develop a medical terminology vocabulary, utilizing a body systems approach that will facilitate communication of medical information in a medical office or hospital environment. The student will learn and practice the principles of medical word formation, including the basic rules of building medical words, identifying suffixes, prefixes, and combining forms related to the structure and function of the associated systems of the body.

Ethics in Healthcare (PHI 206)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to ethical and bio-ethical issues confronting the health care professionals within the practice setting. This course will introduce the student to the language of ethics and to ta decision-making process. Using cases, students will learn to apply ethical decision-making principles to practical dilemmas. The course will familiarize students with ethical and legal considerations, patient-provider relationships, and the concepts of moral judgment and prudence.

Phlebotomy (PHL 100)

Credits:2

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and clinical skills to become a phlebotomist. This course includes study of the role of the phlebotomist, the function of each clinical laboratory section and the functions of personnel employed in the clinical laboratory. This course will focus on laboratory safety, basic anatomy of the circulatory system, venipuncture equipment and techniques, dermal puncture equipment and techniques, as well as complications associated with phlebotomy and legal issues associated with phlebotomy.

Introduction To Psychology (PSY 101)

Credits:3

This course studies psychology as an applied science and explores the genetic and environmental factors, which influence behavior and affect the quality of life. The course begins with a brief history of the development of psychology as a science of human behavior and covers such topics as: psychology of learning, social psychology, human sexuality, stress and coping, as well as abnormal behavior and treatments. Through assigned readings and projects, students will become more aware of the factors that affect human behaviors; theirs and that of others.

Developmental Psychology (PSY 201)

Credits:3

This course provides the student with a multi-disciplinary study of life span development from prenatal stages through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, and death. Topics covered include discussions of genetic, environmental, psychological, and sociological influences on the development of and changes in physical, cognitive and language, and psychosocial domains of individuals.

Developmental Psych. 8 weeks (PSY 201I)

Credits:3

This course provides the student with a multi-disciplinary study of life span development from prenatal stages through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, and death. Included will be discussions of genetic, environmental, psychological and sociological influences of the development of and changes in physical, cognitive and language and psychosocial domains of individuals.

Reiki: History and Practice (REI 290)

Credits:3

College Writing with a minimum grade of "C" required or Accuplacer WritePlacer minimum score of "5" and Accuplacer Reading Comprehension minimum score of "60"

Bridge to College Transition (SEM 020)

Credits:1

Develop skills necessary to be a successful student at Maine College of Health Professions. Learn study skills and test-taking strategies, develop time and stress management strategies for dealing with the intensive course load at this college, learn how to navigate the college system, and learn APA citation style and information literacy, two skills vital to your success at this college. To maximize your learning experience, all fifteen classroom hours will be conducted together over the course of two successive days. Lunch provided.

Introduction to Sociology (SOC 101)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the study of human society. The course stresses the learned nature of human behavior as seen in the ongoing interactions between individuals, groups, and society. The course examines aspects of social life, social factors, and social problems present in contemporary society. More specifically the course presents basic concepts and theories and explores topics including sociology as science, culture, socialization, social groups, social organization, class, race and ethnicity, gender, age, family, and social change.

Social Science Elective (SSC)

Credits:3